Ron Thompson is a Kansas City, Mo. native. In his early childhood, the first person to invest in Thompson's art career was his mother Beverly Ann. Beverly Ann. Beverly was and still is Thompson's motivation to become great. Thompson is forever grateful to have a mother that was sensitive and aware of his true purpose and potential.

In the beginning, Thompson's art supplies were Legos, model car kits and drawing materials. But high school was the launching pad for Thompson's development into a skilled artist. While attending Paseo Academy of Fine and Performing Arts, his mentors and teachers pushed him to attend college. Lincoln University, a Historically Black College and University (HBCU) in Jefferson City, Mo., accepted him with open arms. Being the first in his family to go to college, Thompson was a trailblazer in uncharted territory. With the help of Dr. David B. Henson, the Alpha Psi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha, Inc., and the Lincoln family, Thompson started to become aware of his culture and identity. Through relearning, redefining and developing a more mature understanding of African American identity, Thompson learned that he could use art as a tool to educate others. 

After graduating, Thompson decided to pursue his master’s in Fine Arts at the Memphis College of Art in Tennessee, where his drawing skills and understanding of Fine Art concepts matured to a new level. After a year, Thompson had a strong desire to go back to Missouri and was finally accepted into the University of Missouri’s MFA program. While at the University of Missouri–Columbia, Thompson’s “My America” was born. “My America” was inspired by “My America” by John Biggers and W. E. B. Du Bois’ concept of Double Consciousness. Thompson combined these two concepts to redefine Black identity in Western culture. Despite the rigors of graduate school, Thompson became the second African American in the University of Missouri’s history to graduate with his Masters of Fine Arts degree. Thompson would eventually become an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Drawing at the University of Missouri. Today, Thompson resides in Chicago, still pushing to become great.